Get Up And Go Test Pdf

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Timed Up and Go test

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Balance in elderly patients: the "get-up and go" test

Primarily used to measure gate and balance. This is a simple test often used in non-acute settings. The patient is asked to stand up without using arm assistance from a straight backed chair. Then the patient is asked to walk 10 feet, turn around and come back to the chair. These activities should be performed under 10 seconds.

Balance in elderly patients: the "get-up and go" test

The "get-up and go test" requires patients to stand up from a chair, walk a short distance, turn around, return, and sit down again. This test was conducted in 40 elderly patients with a range of balance function. Tests were recorded on video tapes, which were viewed by groups of observers from different medical backgrounds. Balance function was scored on a five-point scale.

The Timed Up and Go test, also known as the TUG test, is a simple evaluative test used to measure your functional mobility. It is most often used in physical therapy to give your therapist an idea of how safely you can move around. The TUG test can also be used by your doctor to estimate your risk of falling and your ability to maintain balance while walking. The TUG test is frequently used in elderly people as it is easy to administer and can be completed by most older adults. It can be included as part of a more comprehensive Get Up and Go GUG test which involves additional tasks like standing with your eyes closed or sitting in a chair without using the armrests.

The Saskatoon Falls Prevention Consortium recommends two options for screening and referral for community-dwelling older adults. The recommended options are part of this process. Option 1 - Screening questions recommended by the Clinical Practice Guidelines for prevention of falls in older persons. J Am Geriatric Soc ,

The Timed Up and Go TUG is a timed test of functional mobility in which the participant stands up from a standard armchair, walks to a line on the floor 3 m away, turns around, walks back to the chair, and sits down. The test requires a fair amount of coordination, strength, and balance. It has a moderate correlation with fall risk. Skip to main content Skip to table of contents.

Objective: To compare the results from the modified Timed Up and Go Test TUG with posturographic variables, the subjective perception of disability due to gait instability, and the number of falls in a sample of the elderly population with imbalance, to confirm that the TUG Test is a useful clinical instrument to assess the tendency to fall in individuals of this age group. Materials and Methods: Cross-sectional study conducted in a tertiary university hospital, in people aged 65 years or older with gait instability. Modified TUG Test was performed; time, step count and the need for support during the test were the analyzed variables. They were compared with the number of falls, Computerized Dynamic Posturography scores, and questionnaires scores Dizziness Handicap Inventory and a shortened version of the Falls Efficacy Scale-International.

Individuals are asked to rise from a straight-backed chair without using their arms, walk 10 feet or three meters , turn around, return to their chair and sit down. The patient is observed and timed during the event. Adults without balance problems can typically perform this test in under 10 seconds whereas adults with mobility difficulty or activities of daily living ADL dependence require more than 30 seconds.

What Is the Timed Up and Go (TUG) Test?

The Timed Up and Go test TUG is a simple test used to assess a person's mobility and requires both static and dynamic balance. It uses the time that a person takes to rise from a chair, walk three meters, turn around degrees, walk back to the chair, and sit down while turning degrees.

1 Response
  1. Oswaldo J.

    require further evaluation. Timed Up & Go. (TUG). When I say “Go,” I want you to: 1. Stand up from the chair. 2. Walk to the line on the floor at your normal pace.

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